Equipment – Hario V60 Tetsu Kasuya Model

This is one of my favorite drippers I’ve ever used, and since I use Tetsu Kasuya’s 4:6 method a lot lately I’ve been using it every day!

There’s actually a big difference between this dripper and the normal V60. To brew according to the 4:6 method you have to use a lot coarser grind than you’re used to, and since the normal dripper will not hold the coarser coffee in the desired amount of time. The ribs of the dripper have been customized to the 4:6 method making the coffee stay longer in the brewer and making the extraction easier to control.

So how do you actually brew according to the 4:6 method invented by Tetsu Kasuya. I’ll write it as detailed as I can and I’ll also put a link below on his video showing it.

Pour Over: 4:6 method, by Tetsu Kasuya

20 g coffee (grind setting 26B at Baratza Sette 270, medium)
300 g filtered water
60 g blooming 45 seconds
92 degrees Celsius

1) Pour 60g water for blooming for 45 seconds.
2) 45 seconds in, begin your second pour of 60g of water.
3) 1 minute and 30 seconds in,  begin your third pour of 60g of water.
4) 2 minutes and 15 seconds in,  begin your fourth pour of 60g of water.
5) 3 minutes in,  begin your fifth pour of 60g of water.
6) Stop the dripper at 3 minutes and 30 seconds.

*Always rinse the paper filter with filtered hot water, don’t forget to wash the coffee server with clean water afterward, because the taste of the paper might linger.

The recipe above is a standard recipe, it’s what you always should begin with. When you’ve tried that you can think about these two questions:

1) Do you want the coffee more acidic or sweet?
2) Do you want the coffee stronger or more light?

To answer these two questions I’ll begin explain the basics of a 4:6 method.

4:6 means that there is a total of 10 parts of pours, 4 parts in the first half and 6 parts in the second. In this recipe we will use a total of 300 grams of water so let’s divide that into 10 parts. Which will be 300/10= 30.

The first half containing 4 parts, which is 120 grams of water. The second half is 6 parts, which is 180 grams. The common pour is two parts, which is 60 grams of water.

As we can see in the recipe above:

First half is:
60 grams of water
60 grams of water

Second half is:
60 grams of water
60 grams of water
60 grams of water

 

So to answer the first question 1) Do you want the coffee more acidic or sweet?

This is only related to the first half of the pours.

If you want it more acidic, bump up the water in the first pour. Example:

70 grams of water
50 grams of water

If you want it sweeter, bump up the water in the second pour. Example:

50 grams of water
70 grams of water

I’ll write recipes below just to clarify it more.

How about the second question: 2) Do you want the coffee stronger or more light?

This is only related to the second half of the pours.

If you want the coffee to be more light, you’ll just adjust the pours from

60 grams of water
60 grams of water
60 grams of water

to

90 grams of water
90 grams of water.

 

Examples of acidic, sweet and light recipes

Always try the basic recipe first

If you would want to enhance the acidity in your coffee a recipe could look like this:

Pour Over: 4:6 method “Normal”, by Tetsu Kasuya

20 g coffee (grind setting 26B at Baratza Sette 270, medium)
300 g filtered water
60 g blooming 45 seconds
92 degrees Celsius

1) Pour 60g water for blooming for 45 seconds.
2) 45 seconds in, begin your second pour of 60g of water.
3) 1 minute and 30 seconds in,  begin your third pour of 60g of water.
4) 2 minutes and 15 seconds in,  begin your fourth pour of 60g of water.
5) 3 minutes in,  begin your fifth pour of 60g of water.
6) Stop the dripper at 3 minutes and 30 seconds.

If you would want to enhance the acidity in your coffee a recipe could look like this:

Pour Over: 4:6 method “Acidic”, by Tetsu Kasuya

20 g coffee (grind setting 26B at Baratza Sette 270, medium)
300 g filtered water
70 g blooming 45 seconds
92 degrees Celsius

1) Pour 70g water for blooming for 45 seconds.
2) 45 seconds in, begin your second pour of 50g of water.
3) 1 minute and 30 seconds in,  begin your third pour of 60g of water.
4) 2 minutes and 15 seconds in,  begin your fourth pour of 60g of water.
5) 3 minutes in,  begin your fifth pour of 60g of water.
6) Stop the dripper at 3 minutes and 30 seconds.

If you would want to enhance the acidity in your coffee a recipe could look like this:

Pour Over: 4:6 method “Sweet”, by Tetsu Kasuya

20 g coffee (grind setting 26B at Baratza Sette 270, medium)
300 g filtered water
50 g blooming 45 seconds
92 degrees Celsius

1) Pour 50g water for blooming for 45 seconds.
2) 45 seconds in, begin your second pour of 70g of water.
3) 1 minute and 30 seconds in,  begin your third pour of 60g of water.
4) 2 minutes and 15 seconds in,  begin your fourth pour of 60g of water.
5) 3 minutes in,  begin your fifth pour of 60g of water.
6) Stop the dripper at 3 minutes and 30 seconds.

Pour Over: 4:6 method “Lighter”, by Tetsu Kasuya

20 g coffee (grind setting 26B at Baratza Sette 270, medium)
300 g filtered water
60 g blooming 45 seconds
92 degrees Celsius

1) Pour 60g water for blooming for 45 seconds.
2) 45 seconds in, begin your second pour of 60g of water.
3) 1 minute and 30 seconds in,  begin your third pour of 90g of water.
4) 2 minutes and 15 seconds in,  begin your fourth pour of 90g of water.
5) Stop the dripper at 3 minutes.

 

If you want the coffee sweeter you should adjust the fi-

A good coffee that succeeded my expectation, not by much but sufficient to tell you. If you brew as the 4:6 method, by Tetsu Kasuya you will learn how to make a good cup of coffee which you can spice up if you want. But with the flat 60g-60g-60g-60g-60g, you will always get a good cup with almost every coffee. I’ll review the whole technique someday soon.

I’ve written a different 4:6 recipe than last time, this one isn’t a flat 60-60-60-60-60, I’ve weakened the coffee to get out as much fruitiness as I can with choosing to end the three last 60 grams pour to two 90 grams pour.

I tried doing it the flat 4:6 method, by Tetsu Kasuya. But if you try it as well you will find that the coffee is too strong with these characteristics. So to make it milder, end with two last pours of 90g instead of three with 60g of water.

I’ve written a different 4:6 recipe that differs from the first two, I prefer to make this coffee a bit more acidic as I love that with a Kenyan coffee. So I begin with 70g of water. More detail will be written in the recipe of course.

So as Tetsu Kasuya explains with his 4:6 method: using more grams of water in the first pour will give your cup a greater acidic coffee and that was my intention from the beginning. I have to admit that both the flat, mild and sweeter (more water in the second pour) was great. However, I did not get what I unless it was this level of acidity.

 

50grams > 70grams > 60grams > 60grams > 60grams

“I’m again satisfied with the treatment being natural-processed. I’m not as interested in this coffee as the one above. But I have some sort of belief regarding this roastery. I really believe in their expertise!”

I also tried it with more acidic pours (higher water content in the first pour instead of second) and it works as well, I just prefer a sweeter coffee when it comes to Ethiopian coffee. At the end of every review, I tell if you should press this or brew with a pour over. Let’s skip that, use the Hario V60 for this one. It will be great, I promise you!

 

It has a lot of acidity to it, I first thought that it would have some kind of sweetness, but the level of sweetness is a bit low. However, you can easily adjust it with the 4:6 method to enhance the sweetness, but even that has a limit. When you do that the coffee gets more defined and I really enjoy it. Let’s review what they wrote as their description:

Sweeter, acidic, stronger, lighter

 

Tetsu Kasuya Video
Tetsu Kasuya Dripper

 

 

Please follow and like us:

0 comments on “Equipment – Hario V60 Tetsu Kasuya ModelAdd yours →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *